HEY! YOU! MEDIA! Top 5 Notes to Anderson Cooper Regarding His 60 Minutes Hit Piece That I Shot B-Roll For Once Upon a Time When It Was Going To Be About the ADA’s 25th

By Ingrid Tischer, in reaction to the recent “hit piece” on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by 60 FoxNews Minutes.

Tales From the Crip

BREAKING NEWS! ADA HIT PIECE DENIES ONLINE STREAMING ACCESS TO DEAF, HARD OF HEARING COMMUNITY BY FAILING TO CAPTION SAID HIT PIECE! #OuroborosOfDiscrimination

Top 5 Notes to Anderson Cooper Regarding His 60 Minutes Hit Piece That I Shot B-Roll For Once Upon a Time When It Was Going To Be About the ADA’s 25th

1. If an access violation is so obvious it can be found through Google’s aerial view, then, yeah, I expect a business owner to be able to find it.
 

The Legend of the Headless Cripple: Here I am, haunting the halls of the Ed Roberts Campus where I work at DREDF -- or, at least, the part of me that conveniently lacks the ability to think critically or simply wear a facial expression that says, "I'm beginning to think my tenure as the editor of our high school newspaper -- it took 2nd place at Columbia, BTW! -- included more actual journalism and concern about ethics than whatever it is you knobs are cranking out to run between Cialis commercials." /slow clap/, 60 FoxNews Minutes.The Legend of the Headless Cripple: Here I am, haunting the halls of the Ed Roberts Campus where I work at DREDF — or, at least, the part of me that conveniently lacks the ability to think critically or simply wear a facial expression that says, “I’m beginning to think my tenure as the editor of our high school newspaper — it took 2nd place at…

View original post 288 more words

An Open letter to NPR and Unlocking Dyslexia

From author “Nina G Comedian” about her experience as a person with dyslexia, and the importance of learning self advocacy skills from a young age in ensuring that she received the accommodations and supports she needed.

Nina G Comedian

dyslexia-overshadows_custom-f5369e463cbb277eeccc503519aa2e6cbe5cd2bd-s1500-c85.jpg Picture symbolizing dyslexia from NPR’s page.

*This blog is written in my dyslexicon.  I specifically didn’t proof this for edits to demonstrate what my writing is without the standard edits.  

NPR went dyslexic this week for a series on different aspects of dyslexia.  They offered some great information.  My main critique is that the programing didn’t include discussion of civil rights as they relate to individuals with Learning Disabilities.  As someone with dyslexia, who experienced early intervention yet struggled through school, one of the key components for me was advocacy.

I remember the first time that I received an accommodation on a test.  My third grade teacher gave me the test orally.  I told her the answers to her questions.  I was the first one to finish the test and the first one to get an A, likely my first A on a test for that year.  Unfortunately, that…

View original post 399 more words

Space Lettuce

By Julia Bascomb, who is apparently as awesome at presenting as she was at writing a blog back when she was still doing that.

Just Stimming...

[Prepared text of a speech given at the Autistic Self Advocacy Network’s 10th Anniversary Gala on November 16th, 2016]

Hello! Hello, and thank you all so much for being here. How’s everyone doing?

Great. Great, that’s wonderful. I’m so glad to see you all here. We had a lot of internal conversations, over the last week, about how to go about throwing a party after the events of November 8th. And it came down to this idea, and I think it’s crucial, that joy has not gone out of the world. This is a somber time. We’re all feeling pretty grim. And as we look around and talk to each other and begin to figure out what we’re going to do now, it’s critical, it’s absolutely critical, to also set aside time to reflect on and commemorate and celebrate how far we’ve come and what we’ve done. Because, as Ari has…

View original post 1,968 more words

Chronoception

By the author of the Autisticality blog. I wonder if issues with chrono perception could be a partial explanation for some of the executive functioning issues that can come with both autism (which I don’t have) and attention deficit disorder (which I do).

autisticality

Chronoception

chronoception: the sense and perception of time.

Time perception is one of those things that’s so taken for granted, it’s really difficult to actually explain or talk about. Time doesn’t seem like something we perceive or interpret, it’s just seems like something that is. But of course it is something we interpret, because we interpret everything, because that’s what it means to be a brain living inside a meatbag.

Chronoception is also strange because no-one can really agree on whether it’s a neurological sense – along the lines of sensing temperature and balance – or something more psychological.

Time problems

I’ve always known I had a weird ‘Thing’ about time. The first example I usually think of is that I always find it really stressful and anxiety-inducing to know that I have a fixed period of time ahead of me, like “I’ll be in school for six hours from 9 until…

View original post 1,121 more words

Feeling the Weight: Some Beginning Notes on Disability, Access and Love

Leaving Evidence

This essay was originally published in Issue Ten of Makeshift Magazine.

forsythia

This is a beginning; a dive into waters that I swim every day, but have been taught not to speak about.  I struggle with how to talk about love out loud in a way that holds access and doesn’t diminish love in all its glory, but instead illuminates how ableism twists and threatens love and relationships. Needing to constantly negotiate access for my physical disability within all my relationships in an ableist world has shaped the kind of connection and love I am able to have.  I have been scared to open up the Pandora’s box that holds the intimacies of ableism.  Scared to talk about some of the deepest parts of what disability has meant in my life.

Most days I feel like access and love are like oil and water.  I wonder how the two can…

View original post 833 more words

I see you, I welcome you: All Peoples Standing Together

Because there are probably people who need to see this right now … and yes I’m thinking mostly of the US right now but also anyone in other countries who are also feeling upset and worried right now:

To disabled people, including people with chronic health conditions and people who are neurologically diverse and people with psychiatric labels (whether assigned by professionals or self diagnosed), and also people who may not claim a “disability” identity for themselves but have sometimes been classified that way by other people, I see you and embrace you and welcome you

To black people and Latinx people and Arab people and Native Americans and eastern Asian people and south Asian people and southeast Asian people and Caribbean people and people of all racial and ethnic and cultural and linguistic backgrounds, I see you and embrace you and welcome you

To women and non-binary people, I see you and embrace you and welcome you

To LGBTIQA+ people, I see you and embrace you and welcome you

To immigrants from all lands, whether documented or undocumented, I see you and embrace you and welcome you

To Muslim people and people of all other religions, and people of no religion at all or unsure what religion they belong to, I see you and embrace you and welcome you

To people living in poverty, I see you and embrace you and welcome you

To people living within all kinds of intersections – disabled people of color, LBTIQA+ women and non-binary people, poor disabled LGBTIQA+ Muslims of color, and everyone else, I see you and embrace you and welcome you

And, no, I know just platitudes and positive sentiment isn’t enough to fix what went broken in this election. What we need is to put a stop to the bigotry and hate that drove this election and put Trump in the White House. What we need is to stop allowing bigotry and hate to determine our politics and the direction of our country, so we can make our country a country that is truly for everyone.

But I think one initial step in that direction is remembering that we all need to support each other and show solidarity for each other. Consider populations whose needs and fears and hurts you don’t know much about, and seek out blogs and organizations by people in relevant communities or find other ways to listen to them and learn from them about how bigotry and hate and marginalization and exclusion impacts them. Learn to identify all the complex ways that both various forms of privilege and the various forms of oppression and marginalization impact you and what freedoms you have and don’t have in your country, in your state, in your town, in your community, in your family because of these identities. Learn how to stand as allies with friends in other communities you don’t belong to in ways that have a genuine, meaningful, and tangible impact on their daily lives. And continue shoring up your own communities as well. And try to remember that we all need to be in this together, so we can start to show Trump supporters what it really means to be a country and a national community, and what it really means to let love always, always win.

And, yes, please do share this. If it helps you, if you hope it might help others, please share this. If you agree with everything in this essay and plan to both give and receive support across all communities and consider ways to help love win our country and the world, then yes please share this.

(Dated 9 November 2016)

Reviving the concept of cousins.

Post by Mel Baggs. I’m reblogging because, as a person with attention deficit disorder, I often relate to some of the experiences that autistic people have with executive functioning issues (which can be a part of autism as well as a major part of AD(H)D). Mel suggests expanding the concept of “cousins” from autism to other disabilities. In this spirit, you could argue that auditory processing disorder is a kind of “cousin” of deafness in that many aspects of the experience for both disabilities are very similar to each other in that both communities have difficulties understanding what people say when they talk with their mouths. Of course it gets complicated because deafness, aside from being a disability, is ALSO a cultural identification, particularly when used by the signing community and capitalized (“big D” “Deaf”, as opposed to “little d” “deaf”), and for cultural or linguistic identification not every aspect of your experience necessarily has to be perfectly identical.

It is worth following the link to read Mel’s full blog post.

Ballastexistenz

Someone decided this was going to be Autistic History Month.  I had another contribution I was going to write.  In fact, it’s already almost written.  But I ended up writing this instead.  At first glance, it seems to be specific to autistic people.  But while it applies to autistic people, it also applies equally well to a lot of other disabled people, so it’s not necessary to ignore it because you’re not autistic.

There’s something the autistic community⁠1 has lost.  And I think it’s high time we got it back, possibly in an improved form.  It’s the concept of cousins.

It started with a man who had hydrocephalus.   I met him once, after the events I’m going to recount were already in the distant past.  But I’m leaving his name out in the interests of privacy, given that when he wrote about these events in Our Voice

View original post 1,984 more words