Disability Discrimination and the Glorification of Canada’s “Ruthless” Immigration System

By blogger “Crippled Scholar”

crippledscholar

Flag_of_Canada.svg Image Description: Canadian Flag. A red maple leaf on a white background with red vertical stripes at either end.

Today I came across two conflicting news articles, one of them Canadian, the other American. They both deal with the Canadian immigration system but they come to vastly different conclusions. The American article which appeared in the New York Times entitled Canada’s Ruthlessly Smart Immigration Policy, glorifies the Canadian by the numbers immigration system. Conversely, a Global News report looked at Canadian grown advocacy against that same immigration system. Their primary concern, the fact that the system is discriminatory against disabled people.

I have written previously about how the Canadian immigration system actively discriminates against disabled people and what this means for the status of disabled people within Canada and abroad. When I first wrote that article, it garnered very little attention but since the election of Donald Trump as…

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Can A Story Be Too Diverse? a Guest Post by Felix Yz author Lisa Bunker

Guest post by author Lisa Bunker at the blog LGBTQ Reads

LGBTQ Reads

Today on the site, we welcome Lisa Bunker, author of the just-released-yesterday Felix Yz! This Middle Grade debut features a gay protagonist, several other characters under the LGBTQ+ umbrella, and a whole lot more. Here’s the info:

28525367When Felix Yz was three years old, a hyperintelligent fourth-dimensional being became fused inside him after one of his father’s science experiments went terribly wrong. The creature is friendly, but Felix—now thirteen—won’t be able to grow to adulthood while they’re still melded together. So a risky Procedure is planned to separate them . . . but it may end up killing them both instead.

This book is Felix’s secret blog, a chronicle of the days leading up to the Procedure. Some days it’s business as usual—time with his close-knit family, run-ins with a bully at school, anxiety about his crush. But life becomes more out of the ordinary with the arrival of…

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What Makes Institutions Bad

By Mel Baggs

Ballastexistenz

[I wrote this in response to a Dave Hingsburger post. Andrea Shettle asked me to post it here. Summary of my very long response: Most people don’t have the foggiest clue what’s bad about institutions. What’s bad is something you pretty much never hear about, which is the violence it does to people’s insides at a very deep level. And that can’t be stopped by just removing the things that LOOK bad and throwing a layer of glamour on top.]

Please, please, please everyone who talks about this in the past tense — STOP. This is still going on. Everywhere.

I can’t even explain what it feels like to read things like this. Because I think too many people get the wrong kind of idea.

They will think that this is over. It’s not.

They will think that the awfulness and cruelty of an institution is measured by the size…

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New research shows role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort and disinterest

A recent Hiram College (Ohio) study reveals that disability simulations often result in feelings of fear, apprehension and pity toward those with disabilities.

Source: New research shows role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort and disinterest

[Comment from me — we knew this already from earlier, somewhat similar research, but here is new corroborating evidence. The sad thing is that even people with disabilities ourselves have sometimes encouraged the use of role-playing disability stimulations on the misguided idea that these would be helpful. Including me, when I was growing up. And some disabled adults in more recent years as well. I hope later research will help us find better alternatives, because I think one reason why people keep using disability simulation role plays is because they don’t know anything else that might be more effective.]

Return of the Ableist Narrative: Why do We Keep Having to Demand Food Accessibility

Blog post by author of the “Crippled Scholar” blog, who is a doctoral student in disability studies.

crippledscholar

A little over a year ago a tweet went viral.

Image Description: tweet with a picture of peeled oranges in plastic containers on a grocery store (whole foods) shelf. Tweet reads “If only nature could find a way to cover these oranges so we didn’t need to waste so much plastic on them”

This tweet had everything it needed to go viral. It featured a picture of a product that was perceived to have no real use and to be extremely wasteful. It was paired with catchy sarcastic commentary. It’s no wonder that not only did the tweet go viral. It sparked many articles condemning the environmental impact of plastic and what was perceived as a particularly egregious example of…

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Before I Resist and Persist, I Must Exist: Bioethical Choice, Living “Like That,” and Working the Early Shift of Cleaning Up Ableist Narratives

Tales From the Crip

filmdis-feb-18-1I represented DREDF in this conversation but it’s stirred up a big case of the feels about “choice” and being a liberal woman writer with a congenital disability, and the context this establishes for storytelling, and resisting and persisting. I continue, after 30 years of adult activism, to feel like I have an  early shift of ableism — prepping the world to accept that I exist — while my nondisabled fellow human resisters and persisters get to sleep in.  And if I weren’t white, conventionally educated, cis gendered, unthreateningly queer, and had all sorts of middle-class, married advantages, I’d probably never sleep at all. Image courtesy of the Disability Visibility Project.

 Step 1: I Exist!

As many people who know me know — all too well — I’ve been writing a novel* for the past 400 years or so. The novel, The Cure for Gretchen Lowe, is the…

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On Deaf Ableism: Disabled People Aren’t Broken

By Silas Beasley
I am another person who is also Deaf/deaf and disabled . Although I respect that some Deaf people don’t want the disability label for themselves, I think sometimes the rejection of that label is rooted in ableism. People, disability is not a bad word. And as Silas Beasley says in this article, “disability” does not mean “lesser than”. It is not a synonym for “helpless”, it simply means you’re living in a society that isn’t designed for you. If you don’t want to identify as a person with disabilities, fine. It’s your identity, and that makes it your choice. But please try to respect those of us who do feel comfortable defining ourselves as people with disabilities while also being deaf/Deaf, whether because we have additional disabilities or because we are comfortable with defining our deafness as being BOTH a cultural identity AND a disability.

sigh less + live more

Disability — it’s a word that makes every other deaf person I know cringe, anger boiling in them as they protest the label being applied. They are separate from those people, they can do anything but hear, they are not limited by deafness. They see the word disability as a scarlet letter, as it if were a slur negating anything positive.

The summer after I left high school, I finally got over my self consciousness and asked my grandmother if I could have her old cane. Her knee surgery had made it too difficult to use it any longer, so she used a walker. The old, claw-foot mobility aid was bestowed upon me, and I quickly wrapped it in rainbow duct tape I had bought from a nearby dollar store.

Slipping knee braces on seemed to push in all the throbbing in my legs that meant walking was a challenge…

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