No, I don’t Worry about Alienating Allies

Post by Kim Sauder at her “Crippled Scholar” blog

crippledscholar

I have noticed in my online activism that if I call out problematic behaviour or comment on the cultural context of disability being mentioned in particular contexts either by an ally or by someone who is perceived as an ally, I will often be chastened for the nebulous offence of “alienating allies”.

When this happens, allies seem to stop being people who are devoted to the idea of meaningfully improving the lives of disabled people but are in fact thin skinned individuals who will reject the rights of disabled people if they are not rewarded with copious amounts of praise regardless of the impact of their actions.

As Ginny Di puts it,

http://ginnydi.tumblr.com/post/153247564955/okay-heres-the-problem-with-the-idea-that

The thing is, the pushback that I experience has never been from the people I am directly commenting on but either other disabled people who are concerned that the criticism will lead to the loss of allies…

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Disability is often written out of history. We need to ask why

Written by Rosemary Frazer

Scope's Blog

As we continue to mark Disability History Month, Bekki Smiddy writes about  chemist and inventor Alfred Nobel. His legacy are the Nobel Prizes.  Nobel experienced epileptic seizures throughout childhood and here Bekki talks about her own experience of epilepsy and why it’s important we recognise that disability is not a bar to achieving great things in life.

I was diagnosed with idiopathic generalised epilepsy when I was eleven, after several years of unexplained seizures. I had no idea what any of it meant. And I didn’t really care. What I did care about was the way people had started to look at me.

Before I was diagnosed, I figured epilepsy meant I fell down and couldn’t remember sometimes, it wasn’t a big deal. It was other people that made it a big deal.

Every time the word epilepsy came up, everyone in the room would look at me.

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Have Your Voice Heard!

A student is looking for autistic AAC users, and also for their parents, to complete a survey about how aac is (or isn’t) used in schools. Or if you are no longer a student, you can complete it based on your memories of school. The student herself is autistic.

Emma's Hope Book

For my Research and Writing English class this year I have to write a paper on a topic of my choice that weaves data and data analysis with factually based interpretation of that data. My research question for this paper is:  To what extent is it possible to compare the ways in which methods of communication are being taught to autistic students who cannot use spoken language to communicate their complex ideas?

Because many existing communication methods are underrepresented in most schools, I created a survey to find out what methods students use, what they are being taught to use and how successful each is.  Additionally I am curious to know whether a student’s school allows the communication method chosen by each student to be the most beneficial, and if not, how the student then communicates their complex thinking and knowledge.

This survey uses a google form and is completely anonymous.  You will…

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HEY! YOU! MEDIA! Top 5 Notes to Anderson Cooper Regarding His 60 Minutes Hit Piece That I Shot B-Roll For Once Upon a Time When It Was Going To Be About the ADA’s 25th

By Ingrid Tischer, in reaction to the recent “hit piece” on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by 60 FoxNews Minutes.

Tales From the Crip

BREAKING NEWS! ADA HIT PIECE DENIES ONLINE STREAMING ACCESS TO DEAF, HARD OF HEARING COMMUNITY BY FAILING TO CAPTION SAID HIT PIECE! #OuroborosOfDiscrimination

Top 5 Notes to Anderson Cooper Regarding His 60 Minutes Hit Piece That I Shot B-Roll For Once Upon a Time When It Was Going To Be About the ADA’s 25th

1. If an access violation is so obvious it can be found through Google’s aerial view, then, yeah, I expect a business owner to be able to find it.
 

The Legend of the Headless Cripple: Here I am, haunting the halls of the Ed Roberts Campus where I work at DREDF -- or, at least, the part of me that conveniently lacks the ability to think critically or simply wear a facial expression that says, "I'm beginning to think my tenure as the editor of our high school newspaper -- it took 2nd place at Columbia, BTW! -- included more actual journalism and concern about ethics than whatever it is you knobs are cranking out to run between Cialis commercials." /slow clap/, 60 FoxNews Minutes.The Legend of the Headless Cripple: Here I am, haunting the halls of the Ed Roberts Campus where I work at DREDF — or, at least, the part of me that conveniently lacks the ability to think critically or simply wear a facial expression that says, “I’m beginning to think my tenure as the editor of our high school newspaper — it took 2nd place at…

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An Open letter to NPR and Unlocking Dyslexia

From author “Nina G Comedian” about her experience as a person with dyslexia, and the importance of learning self advocacy skills from a young age in ensuring that she received the accommodations and supports she needed.

Nina G Comedian

dyslexia-overshadows_custom-f5369e463cbb277eeccc503519aa2e6cbe5cd2bd-s1500-c85.jpg Picture symbolizing dyslexia from NPR’s page.

*This blog is written in my dyslexicon.  I specifically didn’t proof this for edits to demonstrate what my writing is without the standard edits.  

NPR went dyslexic this week for a series on different aspects of dyslexia.  They offered some great information.  My main critique is that the programing didn’t include discussion of civil rights as they relate to individuals with Learning Disabilities.  As someone with dyslexia, who experienced early intervention yet struggled through school, one of the key components for me was advocacy.

I remember the first time that I received an accommodation on a test.  My third grade teacher gave me the test orally.  I told her the answers to her questions.  I was the first one to finish the test and the first one to get an A, likely my first A on a test for that year.  Unfortunately, that…

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Space Lettuce

By Julia Bascomb, who is apparently as awesome at presenting as she was at writing a blog back when she was still doing that.

Just Stimming...

[Prepared text of a speech given at the Autistic Self Advocacy Network’s 10th Anniversary Gala on November 16th, 2016]

Hello! Hello, and thank you all so much for being here. How’s everyone doing?

Great. Great, that’s wonderful. I’m so glad to see you all here. We had a lot of internal conversations, over the last week, about how to go about throwing a party after the events of November 8th. And it came down to this idea, and I think it’s crucial, that joy has not gone out of the world. This is a somber time. We’re all feeling pretty grim. And as we look around and talk to each other and begin to figure out what we’re going to do now, it’s critical, it’s absolutely critical, to also set aside time to reflect on and commemorate and celebrate how far we’ve come and what we’ve done. Because, as Ari has…

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Chronoception

By the author of the Autisticality blog. I wonder if issues with chrono perception could be a partial explanation for some of the executive functioning issues that can come with both autism (which I don’t have) and attention deficit disorder (which I do).

autisticality

Chronoception

chronoception: the sense and perception of time.

Time perception is one of those things that’s so taken for granted, it’s really difficult to actually explain or talk about. Time doesn’t seem like something we perceive or interpret, it’s just seems like something that is. But of course it is something we interpret, because we interpret everything, because that’s what it means to be a brain living inside a meatbag.

Chronoception is also strange because no-one can really agree on whether it’s a neurological sense – along the lines of sensing temperature and balance – or something more psychological.

Time problems

I’ve always known I had a weird ‘Thing’ about time. The first example I usually think of is that I always find it really stressful and anxiety-inducing to know that I have a fixed period of time ahead of me, like “I’ll be in school for six hours from 9 until…

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